Katha of Baba Santa Singh ji of Prachin Panth Prakash Part 4

Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa Vahiguru ji ki fateh! I was listening to the katha of Baba Santa Singh ji of Prachin Panth Prakash, and decided to try and make it clearer by digitally remastering it. I think it is a lot clearer and louder now. As I listen to them I will post them up with the relevant chapters from the epic work by Bhai Rattan Singh Shahid: http://www.scribd.com/doc/61685716/Sri-Gur-Panth-Prakash-Rattan-Singh-Bhangoo-English see from pages 18 to 26.

https://soundcloud.com/kamalroop-singh/sri-gur-panth-prakash-by-2

Unfortunately pp.11 – 17 are missing which tell how the British asked Rattan Singh to write his epic and mentions General Ochterlony, and Captain Murray. I have heard this was due to Baba Santa Singh ji telling the history of the Badal family and how they were British agents, and then joined the GOI. If anyone has tape number three please send it to me.

Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu – Nihang Singh in his katha talks about the failure of the devte, and mentions the katha of this in Sarbloh Granth Sahib ji by Guru Gobind Singh ji, hence why the light of Akal Purakh Sahib ji, Guru Nanak became pargat in Kalyug. Bhai Rattan Singh ji then quotes this shabad from Adi Guru Granth Sahib ji Maharaj:

In this dark age of Kaliyuga symbolised by a pair of scissors,
The rulers have turned themselves into butchers.
Dharma or Moral values have disappeared from public life.
The truth, symbolised by Moon, has been eclipsed in this darkest phase.

ਕਲਿ ਕਾਤੀ ਰਾਜੇ ਕਾਸਾਈ ਧਰਮੁ ਪੰਖ ਕਰਿ ਉਡਰਿਆ।
ਕੂੜੁ ਅਮਾਵਸ ਸਚੁ ਚੰਦ੍ਰਮਾ ਦੀਸੈ ਨਾਹੀ ਕਹ ਚੜਿਆ।

kali kātī râje kāsāī dharmu pankh kari uḍriā.
kūṛu amāvas sachu chandramā dīsai nāhī kah chaṛiā.

Guru Nanak Dev Ji, Rag Majh, AG, ang 145.

Interestingly Guru Nanak is referred to as Nihkalank by Rattan Singh Bhangu:

ਨਿਹਕਲੰਕ ਤੇ ਨਾਨਕ ਕਹਵਾਯੋ ।੧੨।
nihkalank te nānak kahvāyo.12

Then Baba Santa Singh performs exegesis on the coming of Guru Nanak from the Sri Gur Panth Prakash of Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu Shahid.

Akali Baba Surjeet Singh Human Rights Petition

Who is Akali Baba Surjit Singh

Singh Sahib Jathedar Akali Baba Surjit Singh Nihang 96 Crori is the Current Jathedar (Leader) of Shiromani Panth Akali Buddha Dal. This traditional organisation is the Khalsa Dal created by Guru Gobind Singh as the vanguard of the Sikh Panth. A number of famous Khalsa Jathedars came from this institution including Akali Baba Phula Singh Nihang of Buddha Dal and Akali Baba Deep Singh Nihang of Tarana Dal, to name a few. This organisation can trace its lineage back to the first army of the Sikhs called the Akali Dal at the time of the Sixth Guru and was named after Baba Buddha ji, and is therefore where the current organisation derives its name from.

Baba Surjit Singh hails from Marad village of Gurdaspur, Punjab, India, and was selected as the 14th Jathedar of Buddha Dal by his predecessor Singh Sahib Jathedar Baba Santa Singh 96 Crori. The veteran Nihang Singhs had a Khalsa meeting (Gurmatta), and Baba Surjit Singh ji was officially and democratically elected, due to his faithful and uncompromising nature and following of all the historical codes of conducts that his predecessors followed before him. Baba Surjit Singh began serving this battalion from a very young age where he was responsible for the hard and rigorous sewa of looking after the Guru’s horses for over 35 years. He is a dedicated member of the Dal Panth where he was a trusted and admired Hazuri Sewak of Akali Baba Santa Singh 96 Crori, under whose wing he learnt the Guru’s teachings and the prescribed rahit maryada. He is a true saint of the 21st century, as well as devotedly preserving the original traditions of the Guru and well versed in Sikh history, and the dynamics of the Gurus teachings. Baba Surjit Singh is a true practitioner of the teachings, as he only accepts the truth no matter what the outcome, and he has a vision to take Buddha Dal to the new heights. While he was actively taking forward the activities started by predecessor, the Government of Panjab installed a puppet regime that made false court cases and allegations against him, as had been done with Baba Santa Singh the previous Jathedar of the Buddha Dal. The motivation behind this was to control all organisations that oppose the monopoly of the current corrupt Panjab Government .

Baba ji has currently been imprisoned for six years in Patiala Central Jail,with other political prisoners like Rajoana Sahib.There has been no conviction against him, as the charges are fabricated, and do not hold up in Court.All the prosecution case files against Baba Surjit Singh were given to a leading independent forensics company in the UK to examine the evidence against him , and they concluded as there were major inconsistencies and irregularities with the evidence and would render this evidence inadmissible in the Court of law. Furthermore twenty-two other Singhs are in jail with Baba ji, six of whom have no charges filed against them other than being part of the Buddha Dal and have been incarcerated for six years. This human right abuse needs to be rectified and we should come together once again and show support for the Singhs illegally held in Jail.. This Petition will be used to lobby the relevant bodies for Justice.

Hanuman Natak in Gurmukhi by Hirdaya Ram Bhalla

Complete text with introduction by Dr Kamalroop Singh.

I have been painstakingly typing this text over of the years. This is the first edition of the Hanūmān Nāṭak, the second edition will contain the transliteration, and the third a translation. I have proof read it, but I am sure there are mistakes, so if you find any please be kind enough to send me a message with the details.

What is Hanūmān Nāṭak?
Guru Gobind Singh and the Hanūmān Nāṭak 
The Dasam Granth Sahib and Hanūmān Nāṭak
Hanūmān Nāṭak and the Pre-colonial Education System in the Punjab
The Buddha Dal and Hanūmān Nāṭak
Complete Text of Hanūmān Nāṭak by Hirdaya Ram Bhalla

Sri Gur Panth Prakash – Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu Shahid – Narrated by Akali Nihang Baba Santa Singh Ji 96 Crori – Part 2

Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa Vahiguru ji ki fateh! I was listening to the katha of Baba Santa Singh ji of Prachin Panth Prakash, and decided to try and make it clearer by digitally remastering it. I think it is a lot clearer and louder now.https://soundcloud.com/kamalroop-singh/sri-gur-panth-prakash-by-1 As I listen to them I will post them up with the relevant chapters from the epic work by Bhai Rattan Singh Shahid: http://www.scribd.com/doc/49130153/Panth-Prakash-by-Rattan-Singh-Bhangoo-English-Translation see from page 7 to 11.

Sri Gur Panth Prakash – Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu Shahid – Narrated by Akali Nihang Baba Santa Singh Ji 96 Crori – Part 1

Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa Vahiguru ji ki fateh! I was listening to the katha of Baba Santa Singh ji of Prachin Panth Prakash, and decided to try and make it clearer by digitally remastering it. I think it is a lot clearer and louder now. As I listen to them I will post them up with the relevant chapters from the epic work by Bhai Rattan Singh Shahid. Please see http://www.scribd.com/doc/49130153/Panth-Prakash-by-Rattan-Singh-Bhangoo-English-Translation and check pages 1 to 7

Arati-Arata by Dr Kamalroop Singh (Akali Nihang)

Vahiguru ji ka Khalsa Vahiguru ji ki fateh! I just finished writing about the Āratī-Āratā, I put in a eight hours a day for the last week or so, not to boast, but some people don’t understand how much goes into just writing forty pages! With Guru Nanak’s kirpa, I offer the first full English translation, transliteration, and original text of the Āratī-Āratā, along with a discussion of this devotional bani. Āratī-Āratā is an evening prayer that is a part of the purātan nitnem of the Sikhs. Most Sikhs have heard of the Āratī of Guru Nanak and the Bhagats, but few have heard the full version that includes many inspiring verses by Guru Gobind Singh. The Singh Sabha under the influence of Giani Ditt Singh edited the practice of using lamps or deve, and cut down the length of the piece by removing most of Guru Gobind Singh’s bani from it. The unedited version remains the preserve of the Akali Nihang Singh Khalsa. This is discussed in this document, as well as showing that this is one of the only bania to have the writings of Adi Guru, Dasam and Sarbloh within it. Please read at: http://www.scribd.com/doc/183005595/Arati-Arata-by-Dr-Kamalroop-Singh-Akali-Nihang-pdf We will be looking at making some printed copies in the near future, so people can read from them during the ceremony. If you like this document please read my small article on the nitnem, http://www.scribd.com/doc/130906016/The-History-of-the-Nitnem-BĀņiĀ-Akali-Dr-Kamalroop-Singh-Nihang My next article will be on the puratan Rahiras Sahib, as Karen Kaur Bansal requested it! I have not forgotten. Many thanks to Gavin Singh who requested this document, and his initial help with finding files for me, and to Indy Saggu who proof read this document. Could some translate these into Punjabi please? Please pray that I can continue doing your seva, and please share this document so people 1. Read the Bani and understand it 2. So they know how our traditions have been changed. Bhul chuk maffi, das Kamalroop Singh Āratī-Āratā is an evening prayer that is a part of the purātan nitnem of the Sikhs. Most Sikhs have heard of the Āratī of Guru Nanak and the Bhagats, but few have heard the full version that includes many inspiring verses by Guru Gobind Singh. The unedited version remains the preserve of the Akali Nihang Singh Khalsa.

Āratī-Āratā is an evening prayer that is a part of the purātan nitnem of the Sikhs. Most Sikhs have heard of the Āratī of Guru Nanak and the Bhagats, but few have heard the full version that includes many inspiring verses by Guru Gobind Singh. The unedited version remains the preserve of the Akali Nihang Singh Khalsa.

Arati-Arata by Dr Kamalroop Singh (Akali Nihang).pdf by Dr. Kamalroop Singh

Account of the Akali Nihang Singh Khalsa in ‘The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India’, 1916

The Akālis or Nihangs are a fanatical order of Sikh ascetics. The following extract is taken from Sir E. Maclagan’s account of them:3
“The Akālis came into prominence very early by their stout resistance to the innovations introduced by the Bairāgi Banda after the death of Guru Govind; but they do not appear to have had much influence during the following century until the days of Mahārāja Ranjit Singh. They constituted at once the most unruly and the bravest portion of the very unruly and brave Sikh army. Their headquarters were at Amritsar, where they constituted themselves the guardians of the faith and assumed the right to convoke synods. They levied offerings by force and were the terror of the Sikh chiefs. Their good qualities were, however, well appreciated by the Mahārāja, and when there were specially fierce foes to meet, such as the Pathāns beyond the Indus, the Akālis were always to the front.
“The Akāli is distinguished very conspicuously by his dark-blue and checked dress, his peaked turban, often surmounted with steel quoits, and by the fact of his strutting about like Ali Bāba’s prince with his ‘thorax and abdomen festooned with curious cutlery.’ He is most particular in retaining the five Kakkas, and in preserving every outward form prescribed by Guru Govind Singh. Some of the Akālis wear a yellow turban underneath the blue one, leaving a yellow band across the forehead. The yellow turban is [324]worn by many Sikhs at the Basant Panchmi, and the Akālis are fond of wearing it at all times. There is a couplet by Bhai Gurdās which says:
Siah, Sufed, Surkh, Zardae,
Jo pahne, sot Gurbhai;
or, ‘Those that wear black (the Akālis), white (the Nirmalas), red (the Udāsis) or yellow, are all members of the brotherhood of the Sikhs.’
“The Akālis do not, it is true, drink spirits or eat meat as other Sikhs do, but they are immoderate in the consumption of bhāng. They are in other respects such purists that they will avoid Hindu rites even in their marriage ceremonies.
“The Akāli is full of memories of the glorious day of the Khālsa; and he is nothing if he is not a soldier, a soldier of the Guru. He dreams of armies, and he thinks in lakhs. If he wishes to imply that five Akālis are present, he will say that ‘five lakhs are before you’; or if he would explain he is alone, he will say that he is with ‘one and a quarter lakhs of the Khālsa.’ You ask him how he is, and he replies that ‘The army is well’; you inquire where he has come from, and he says, ‘The troops marched from Lahore.’ The name Akāli means ‘immortal.’ When Sikhism was politically dominant, the Akālis were accustomed to extort alms by accusing the principal chiefs of crimes, imposing fines upon them, and in the event of their refusing to pay, preventing them from performing their ablutions or going through any of the religious ceremonies at Amritsar.”
7. The Sikh Council or Guru-Māta. Their communal meal.
The following account was given by Sir J. Malcolm of the Guru-Māta or great Council of the Sikhs and their religious meal:4 “When a Guru-Māta or great national Council is called on the occasion of any danger to the country, all the Sikh chiefs assemble at Amritsar. The assembly is convened by the Akālis; and when the chiefs meet upon this solemn occasion it is concluded that all private animosities cease, and that every man sacrifices his personal feelings at the shrine of the general good.


“When the chiefs and principal leaders are seated, the Adi-Granth and Dasama Pādshāh Ka Granth5 are placed before them. They all bend their heads before the Scriptures and exclaim, ‘Wah Guruji ka Khālsa! wah Guruji ka Fateh!6 A great quantity of cakes made of wheat, butter and sugar are then placed before the volumes of their sacred writings and covered with a cloth. These holy cakes, which are in commemoration of the injunction of Nānak to eat and to give to others to eat next receive the salutation of the assembly, who then rise, while the Akālis pray aloud and the musicians play. The Akālis, when the prayers are finished, desire the Council to be seated. They sit down, and the cakes are uncovered and eaten by all classes of the Sikhs, those distinctions of tribe and caste which are on other occasions kept up being now laid aside in token of their general and complete union in one cause. The Akālis proclaim the Guru-Māta, and prayers are again said aloud. The chiefs after this sit closer and say to each other, ‘The sacred Granth is between us, let us swear by our Scriptures to forget all internal disputes and to be united.’ This moment of religious fervour is taken to reconcile all animosities. They then proceed to consider the danger with which they are threatened, to devise the best plans for averting it and to choose the generals who are to lead their armies against the common enemy.” The first Guru-Māta was assembled by Guru Govind, and the latest was called in 1805, when the British Army pursued Holkar into the Punjab. The Sikh Army was known as Dal Khālsa, or the Army of God, khālsa being an Arabic word meaning one’s own.7 At the height of the Sikh power the followers of this religion only numbered a small fraction of the population of the Punjab, and its strength is now declining. In 1911 the Sikhs were only three millions in the Punjab population of twenty-four millions.

The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India

By 

R.V. Russell

Assisted by

Rai Bahadur Hira Lāl

Vol. I. 

Macmillan and Co., London. 
1916


An Early Portrayal of the Sikhs
an 18th Century Etchings by Baltazard Solvyns